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IMPORTANT MOSQUITO INFORMATION

PROTECTION SUGGESTIONS

FROM THE

REHOBOTH BOARD OF HEALTH

By taking a few, common-sense precautions, people can help to protect themselves and their loved ones.  Please read and follow these instructions:


AVOID MOSQUITO BITES

  1. Be Aware of Peak Mosquito Hours - The hours from dusk to dawn are peak biting times for many mosquitoes. Consider rescheduling outdoor activities that occur during evening or early morning. Otherwise, take extra care to use repellent and protective clothing.

  2. Clothing Can Help reduce mosquito bites. Although it may be difficult to do when it’s hot, wearing long-sleeves, long pants and socks when outdoors will help keep mosquitoes away from your skin.

  3. Apply Insect Repellent when you go outdoors. Use a repellent with DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide), permethrin, picaridin (KBR 3023), IR3535 or oil of lemon eucalyptus [p-methane 3, 8-diol (PMD)] according to the instructions on the product label.  DEET products should not be used on infants under two months of age and should be used in concentrations of 30% or less on older children.  Oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under three years of age.  Permethrin products are intended for use on items such as clothing, shoes, bed nets and camping gear and should not be applied to skin. 


MOSQUITO-PROOF YOUR HOME

  1. Drain Standing Water - Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Limit the number of places around your home for mosquitoes to breed by either draining or getting rid of items that hold water. Check rain gutters and drains. Empty any unused flowerpots and wading pools, and change water in birdbaths frequently. 

  2. Install or Repair Screens - Some mosquitoes like to come indoors. Keep them outside by having tightly-fitting screens on all of your windows and doors.


While Rehoboth continues to work closely with the MDPH and other agencies, locally we want to keep you informed via RehobothNow.com with informational public health notices.


Recorded information about EEE is also available by calling the MDPH Public Health Information Line at 1-866-MASS-WNV (1-866-627-7968).

CONTACT:  Rehoboth Board of Health                                                                                               TELEPHONE: 508-252-5947, ext. 3127

SEASONAL SPRAYING INFORMATION

Beginning June, 2017

Call Mon-Fri from 8 AM to 2 PM

508-823-5253

CONTACT:  Jennifer Dacey, MS - Superintendent

TELEPHONE: 508-823-5253 or Fax 508-828-1868

EMAIL: brismosqsb@comcast.net

SPRAY REQUEST: RequestBristolMCP@comcast.net

Commissioners: Arthur Tobin (Chairman), Greg Dorrance, Christine Fagan, Joseph Barile and Robert Davis


Mosquito control in Massachusetts is conducted through nine mosquito control districts, with 193 member communities. Each district was created by the legislature with enabling legislation specific for each district. The State Reclamation and Mosquito Control Board (SRMCB) oversees all nine districts.


PESTICIDE SPRAYING

  1. BCMCP is permitted to spray by both federal and state agencies including the Environmental Protection Agency. Spraying is limited to: 1) mosquito larvae, 2) adult mosquito populations, and 3) standing water sources.


SPRAYING IN “HOT” SPOTS

  1. BCMCP sprays in identified “hot” spot areas on a regular basis.  Those areas may include locations where mosquitos have tested positive for either EEE or Nile virus.


RESIDENT REQUESTS

  1. Residents may contact the BCMCP to request ground spraying which is usually done in the early morning hours.  Residents requesting spraying in preparation for outdoor events should do so several days in advance of the event date.  If you have questions, please call or email.


SPRAYING EXCEPTIONS

  1. No spraying is done near schools or child care centers


SPRAYING EXCLUSION BY REQUEST

  1. Residents who wish to have their property excluded from any type of pesticide applications must do so with the Rehoboth Town Clerk’s office.

  2. You must supply the following information: a certified letter providing the name, address, telephone number and exclusion request.  This must be done every year.

  3. Those requested exclusion must mark the boundaries of areas to be excluded, at least 50 feet with orange surveyor’s tape or other approved marking devise.

  4. Only properties provided to the Bristol County Mosquito Control Project from the Town Clerk’s office will be placed on the exclusion list.

  5. Any questions, please use the BCMCP contact information listed above. 

SOME PEOPLE ARE BITTEN BY MOSQUITOS MORE FREQUENTLY

  1. 1Blood Type: A controlled study showed that mosquitoes landed on people with Type O blood almost twice as often as people with Type A. “People with Type B blood fell somewhere in the middle of this itchy spectrum.”

  2. 2Carbon Dioxide: Mosquitoes, using an organ called maxillary palp, are attracted to carbon dioxide emissions, and can detect it up to 164 feet away. People who emit more carbon dioxide (i.e. adults more than children, and larger adults) are bitten more.

  3. 3Exercise and Metabolism:  Skeets are also attracted to substances expelled with sweat, such as lactic acid, uric acid and ammonia, as well as to people with higher body temperatures.

  4. 4Beer: One study found that as little as a 12-ounce bottle of beer makes people more attractive to mosquitoes.

  5. 5Pregnancy: Pregnant women are about twice as likely to be bitten due to the fact they exhale about 21 percent more carbon dioxide than others and have body temperatures approximately 1.26 degrees higher than average.

  6. 6Bold, dark colors: James Day, a medical entomologist at the University of Florida, says mosquitoes use vision to find people, and may find you easier if you are wearing a stand-out color such as black, dark blue or red.


   Source: Smithsonian Magazine

EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE)

UPDATE: October 15, 2017

One mosquito collected in Westport was infected with the EEE virus.


WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV)

UPDATE: October 15, 2017

REHOBOTH IS AT MODERATE RISK. Mosquitoes infected with WNV have been identified in Bristol County: Rehoboth, Dighton, Norton,  Attleboro, Seekonk, Swansea and Fairhaven, Achusnet, New Bedford, Dartmouth with a total of 289 mosquitoes samples positive for WNV throughout the state including Cape Cod and the Islands.


TICKS UPDATE: October 2017

CONTINUED VIGILANCE

Health officials recommend the use of insect repellant and daily tick checks for anyone who spends any time outdoors.

Massachusetts Department of Public Health

Arbovirus Daily Update

Bristol County Mosquito Control Project

38R Forest Street . Attleboro, MA

508-823-5253

Email: Priscilla.Matton@MassMail.State.MA.US

IN THE NEWS . . .

Experts Warn of Mosquito Risk